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yellowducati900ss
November 15th, 2001, 02:59 PM
Elliot Peeler ( jelliott@mindless.com ) sent me an email asking me to post this for him. He is not a member yet but he seems to have a pretty good head on him so I will go ahead and do it for him. Please bombard him with the "Get this bike or that bike" stuff, not me. :D -Mike


---------------------

Well, I don't want you guys to think I'm too much of a dork so I'll try to
keep from telling you my entire life's story. I do tend to run-on at the
keyboard so forgive me if this gets too long.

I call myself a new rider but I suppose that really isn't the case, just
yet. I'm still in the planning stages of purchasing my first motorcycle
and
in the course of my research, came across the TSBA web site and this BBS.
To
tell the truth, up until this point I've been torn between what type of
bike
to get. I became interested in getting a motorcycle a zillion years ago
(it
seems) when I was a teenager and at that time, I was sport-bike all the
way.
I had the hots for a VF500F Interceptor when they came out and a little
later the FZR400 made me all queasy inside. As much as I wanted
something...anything on two wheels...I just couldn't swing it financially
and honestly, I suppose it wasn't important enough to me to sacrifice
other
things that I wanted/needed to spend my money on.

Fast forward about 18 years and here I sit, with some disposable income
and
a renewed desire to get on a bike. I don't know if it's the impending
approach of middle-age or what but I've found myself increasingly
attracted
to cruisers in the last year or so. Now, if I were to go back and tell my
teenage self that I would ever be interested in a cruiser.......the
horror!!

That's where I've been for about the last 6 months, wavering between a
sporty bike and a sparkly rumbly barcalounger with spokes. I then come
across this BBS and start sifting through all of the posts in here. I'm
reading about the concern of the veteran riders for the newbies who keep
falling off during the SMR's. I see a genuine desire to help new riders
become more skilled, more aware of their limitations and just plain safer.
I
see experienced riders volunteering to sacrifice their own fun to stay
back,
slow down and mentor new riders. I think to myself... self, this is
something you would really like to get involved with and be a part of.

And so, after months of wavering, sporty bike it shall be.

Here's where I sit, right now. I'm scheduled to take the MSF basic riding
course in mid November. One thing I've known from the start is that I will
not put myself on two wheels, out on the street without having completed
the
MSF course. No way. Once I get licensed, then I'll start seriously
shopping.
Opinions on a good novice bike will be appreciated but I am looking very
hard at the following.

Suzuki SV650
pro's - price, performance
con's - not a Ducati

Ducati Monster
pro's - looks, handling, that siren song sung by all those mechanical bits
working in a perfect symphony of goose bump inducing exhaust music
con's - price, power (although I'm not sure being down on power is really
a
bad thing for me at this point), maintenance headaches?

Buell Cyclone
pro's - unique, cool engine
con's - price, too much motor for a first bike?

There are a couple of others that I find interesting but the SV and Duc
are
at the top of my list. The practical part of me knows that the SV is
probably the smart choice but any comments would be welcome and
appreciated.
Also any recommendations for a decent pair of warm weather gloves (I need
some for the MSF class) and decent set of boots, that don't cost a
fortune,
would be great. I have a helmet that I bought about 15 years ago (I think
I
forgot to mention that I bought a ysr when they came out, lot's of
parking
lot fun without having to go very fast). Do helmets age and need to be
replaced? Some of the internal foam doesn't seem to have the same
sproingy-ness that it used to but it's not too bad. I never fell off of
the
ysr or banged the helmet in any way so other than it's age, it's in
perfect
shape.

So that's it, believe it or not, this is pretty short for me but I'll back
out anyway. I look forward to any comments that anyone may have and
hopefully I will get to meet some of you in the very near future. Wish me
luck at the MSF class!

yellowducati900ss
November 15th, 2001, 03:24 PM
A couple of things for ya...

Most Important!!!
<UL TYPE=SQUARE><LI> Do not use that old helmet. It is not safe. If you really like it, send it into the factory for inspection. They will probably tell you it isn't safe, though.
<LI> You are doing the right thing going to the Safety Course. I would go so far as to say that you should go to the Beginner course, ride for a month, then go to the "Advanced Course". In my opinion, it is not that "Advanced" and you will learn alot.
[/list]

Other Things
<UL TYPE=SQUARE><LI> Glad to hear you are interested in the club.
<LI> Gloves - Can't help you much, looking for them myself
<LI> Boots - Sidi Sympatex are great boots. They are waterproof. I wear Sidi Vertabrae as my "dry" boots
<LI> Helmet - Get one that fits you well. I like the Shoei RF-800 or RF-900 because the shields swap easily so I can have a smoked and a clear shield handy
<LI> Suit - Although I wear leathers, if I had to do it again I would buy a textile 2 piece, zip-together suit. They are lighter, better in warm and cold weather, washable, etc. Of course they don't look as cool but functionality is more important to me right now... smile.gif Aerostitch is the best but it cost more. Other brands also have good quality products.
[/list]

Bikes
You will get a ton of responses on this but I would suggest an SV650 as a first bike. I have never ridden one but from what I have read and seen, they are great bikes for beginners and with some mods you can do just about anything but real high top speed. A guy in the club, Bill, is faster on his SV than many of us on "Faster" bikes.

IMHO, you should not buy a new bike. You will drop it because you forgot to put the kickstand down. You will drop it in a parking lot in your first 6 months. You may find out you don't like that particular bike 1 year from now because you have never ridden before.

That being said, let me respond to some of your preconceptions with my own preconceptions...

<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Suzuki SV650
pro's - price, performance
con's - not a Ducati
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

You are right in both cases, most especially the "con's"... :D

<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Ducati Monster
pro's - looks, handling, that siren song sung by all those mechanical bits working in a perfect symphony of goose bump inducing exhaust music
con's - price, power (although I'm not sure being down on power is really a bad thing for me at this point), maintenance headaches?
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

They are not really maintenance headache. You will pay a bit more for some of the maintenance but if you join the club, you will have plenty of people around willing to help you do your own work. It costs much less for me to own my Ducati and do the work on it with friends than it would for me to not be in the club and have the shop do the work.

Also, there are three versions of the Monster, 600cc, 750cc, and 900cc. Any of the smaller ones would not be too much power but they don't have good resale value. The 900cc has enough power for anything you will do for two years unless you start putting 15,000+ miles on it per year.

<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Buell Cyclone
pro's - unique, cool engine
con's - price, too much motor for a first bike?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Yuck.

I should probably do some work now... :D

Later.

DaJacker
November 15th, 2001, 04:47 PM
I know a guy that is selling a SWEET Monster 750, VERY low milage, 2500 i think, lots-O-carbon on it and a corbin seat. its a 99 model, has 2 brother pipes, sounds bad, but not as bad *** as my 748. he wants $4950 for it, but he might take less, hell he might throw in the helmet, its new as well. GO DUC!!!!!

Weave
November 15th, 2001, 06:06 PM
You have started with a wise choice: V-twins. Much more relaxed than an in-line 4, and you can lug it through the corners. It's a lazy man's engine.

The SV is an awesome ride, and probably your best bet from an objective perspective. Main downside: they lack personality in stock form. Now, I've seen some modified SVs that get my heart racing. So, buying a used SV (as Mike suggested) and "souping it up" yourself would give it a personality all its own.

Monsters: 900 - good, 750 - kinda good (but you'll want more soon). S4 - lots of good! But expensive.

Buell - How can I say it? No. Uh-uh. Nyet.

Of course, the 900 SuperSport has styling, a mesmerizing exhaust note, and outstanding legs through the corners. Not the most top end, but lots of torque. Keeps you out of trouble.

As for helmets, just go to Motoliberty and try on a few new lids. You'll be kicking that old piece of crap to the curb. The technology, styling, and fit has advanced that much.

Welcome to the TSBA. And remember our motto: "If you ain't havin' fun, then you must be behind Faisal."

F1
November 15th, 2001, 08:23 PM
Thanks, brian :cool:

About which bike to get, if I were you I would get a 600 supersport (ZX-6R offcourse would be top o da list, Honda's pretty cool too, both are comfortable), biggest bang for the buck performance/comfort wise, yet you dont have to spend $$ as soon as you get it off the floor. With the SV, you would be looking for suspension (Bill rides it fast as he could ride anything on 2 wheels faster than most of us), with the Ducks, well I'll stay quiet on that one! the list is to long :D :D

But I am not you and looks like you have narrowed it down pretty much (sure hate to see someone buy something and then wish he should have got the real deal!)

Faisal ZX-6R

[ November 15, 2001: Message edited by: Faisal ]

DaJacker
November 15th, 2001, 09:40 PM
ever been beat up buy a duc Fasail ?think the next SMR Im going to leave some duc droppings in your path, just got the new rock chucker tire installed , better not let me in front of you

:D

Todd Hoffmaster
November 15th, 2001, 09:42 PM
You will feel very comfortable riding the SVS. It is an easy bike to ride. The v-twin motor is a calm no suprise kind of motor.

You shouldn't put down the Buell Cyclone, atleast until you have ridden one. We have a member here in S.A. who rides one and it hasn't leaked oil, broke down, or been left behind in the year that he has ridden with us. My wife loves to ride on the back of it, very comfortable bike. Lots of torque. I have seen it do 135 mph up near Rock Springs. It is a good bike, just not a superbike.

wonderdawg
November 15th, 2001, 09:59 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Todd H.:
I have seen it do 135 mph up near Rock Springs.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Good thing you were going downhill with that 50 mph tailwind.

It's hell being the slowest guy on Highway 55 isn't it?

We keep you around as cannon fodder for the Camp Wood Constable. (Gary's idea of course). Say hi to officer Sanchez for me. :D

[ November 15, 2001: Message edited by: mike benson ]

bvia
November 15th, 2001, 10:21 PM
Here we go.

SV, great bike for a beginner or a rider who doesn't have as much to prove with his wrist.
Used ones are pretty cheap and they have little plastic to screw up when you run it into the wooden fence by the side of your driveway. You pay for that on the highway with the tiring windblast.

SV-S, better bike with it's half fairing, clip-ons and higher pegs.

The internet support group (www.svrider.com) is huge and a great community. Also SV riders get pretty nice discounts from local and national parts & gear suppliers. Everything from jetting to various products to suspensions have been tried, sorted and posted. you have a question? svrider.com has got the answer in the FAQ.

Contrary to popular belief, you can't simply ride the torque on the SV. With a 649cc v-twin, the torque isn't swingarm twisting. Better to ride it like a 4 cilynder. Keeping the revs above 5k through the corners.

The suspension is cut-rate. Penske (my choice), Ohlins and Fox sell SV specific shocks and a pre-'99 GSXR 600 will fit with a little modification. RaceTech makes emulators and springs (my choice) as does
Progressive. Traxxion sells a modified gsx600f emulator they swear by. 15-20 wt fork oil helps. Pre'02 forks have no adjustement but '02 has preload caps (which will retrofit older models, no problems)
Run the MEZ4's flat and then go with an 010 front, 020 rear.

No, it's not a Duc. You won't be touching the valvetrain until 16K miles have been put under the tires. You don't have the mystic of a dry-clutch rattle. Instead you get rock solid reliability. Wash it and ride.

Also there is a SV specific riding group in the metroplex, the North Texas SV Rider Group (NTSVRG)with 15 or so members who get together and ride.

Ducs?
Think of them as high priced hookers. Beautiful to look at.
Expensive to own.
You'll be the envy of everyone, but they all know you're the slave, not the master.
Wish i had one ;)&gt;

Buell.
Think of them as the ex-wife.
The buy in was high and while the times you get together are filled with frantic, stolen, mad sexual energy.
The other 29 days of the month it's all about child support(mechanics) and lawyers
fees(monthly payments). They always look great when they are someone elses ;)&gt;

SV.
The girl next door.
Always ready, always willing and ALWAYS able.
She's loyal and will give back more than she receives. She's not the looker of the group, but she'll always come home with the one who
can make her dance.

Mine's blue.
bill
p.s. the YZF600R (NOT R-6) makes a great bike too. Blue of course with the silver wheels.

Dave Whitson
November 15th, 2001, 10:21 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Weave:
And remember our motto: "If you ain't havin' fun, then you must be behind Faisal."<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
http://www.plauder-smilies.com/lach.gif LMFAO


Welcome to the club :D :D


My question to you would be "How do you want to spend your time on your motorcycle?"


If you plan on spending a lot of you're seat time hittin twisties and learnin how to do wheelies and going fast etc. then something like an SV650 or a Honda F4i (or a ZX-6 tongue.gif) would be a great start with plenty of room to grow into.

If you plan on doing alot of commuting or city riding with the regularly scheduled weekend frolic, maybe something a little more commuter friendly might be better. Like a Bandit600, YZF600 or even a VFR800$$$$.


It really comes down to what you like and what is comfortable for you. If you plan on spending a lot of time in the saddle, get a bike that fits you like a glove, no matter what it is, or you will be sorey(except for the Buell....yuck). Hit the bike shops and sit on everything. You'll know when you found the one.


Now, if you want to break out the headlights of anybody that ever rides behind you....Get a ZX-6 :D tongue.gif
Whatever your choice, the MSF classes is definitly a good move. C-Ya smile.gif


Oh Yeah, Go give that old lid to one of the neighbor kids you don't like, and go get the best helmet you can afford.... And wear it!
smile.gif

[ November 15, 2001: Message edited by: Dave W. ]

Chris S.
November 15th, 2001, 10:54 PM
I'll thrown in another vote for the SV, esp. the "S" model. Specs can't convey how much fun this bike is...but you should consider exhaust and suspension mandatory upgrades.

F1
November 15th, 2001, 11:01 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by martys748:
ever been beat up buy a duc Fasail ?think the next SMR Im going to leave some duc droppings in your path, just got the new rock chucker tire installed , better not let me in front of you

:D<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Lol

Faisal ZX-6R

yellowducati900ss
November 15th, 2001, 11:32 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by bill via:

Ducs?
Think of them as high priced hookers. Beautiful to look at.
Expensive to own.
You'll be the envy of everyone, but they all know you're the slave, not the master.
Wish i had one ;)&gt;
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Funny you should say: <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Think of them as high priced hookers.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

When I was leaving the Ducati factory/museum in Bologna, we took a right onto the main road in front of the factory and for the next mile the road was lined with hookers!!! Maybe that is where they get the inspiration!!! :D

Ok, I have to once again state. Ducs are expensive if they are serviced by a dealer and then not as bad as you would think. I do my own oil changes ($15 in parts). Marty is going to help me with my next valve job and when we put in the aftermarket colletts, it pushes off the valve jobs to a claimed 12K - 15K miles. My new sprocket (aftermarket) was $35, Tires are standard, etc. They are not that much more expensive. Remember, you usually don't have to sink a bunch of money into the suspension right away. Of course they are Italian so they have a few eccentricities... They are are kind of a pain in the *** to change the rear wheel on the SS's.

[ November 15, 2001: Message edited by: yellowducati900ssMike ]

F1
November 16th, 2001, 09:47 AM
If you decide to buy a duc, try to negotiate 2 full spare clutch kits, an exhaust system, spare headlights, radiator, hoses for the radiator, desmo stuff etc etc (better yet, ask to get a free duc when you buy one.) Allen went through 2 clutches in the first 3000 miles!

I like Geeks advice

Faisal ZX-6R : tongue.gif
:D

[ November 16, 2001: Message edited by: Faisal ]

yellowducati900ss
November 16th, 2001, 09:50 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Faisal:
Allen went through 2 clutches in the first 3000 miles!

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Allen, how did you go through 2 clutches in 3000 miles? Are you sure you weren't replacing it because it makes noise? It's a Ducati, it is supposed to make noise. That's what makes you cool! :cool:

Weave
November 16th, 2001, 10:36 AM
Ducati's are impulse buys. (At least mine was.) You either look at them and say, "Ooh, ooh, must have!", or you do your homework, look at the costs vs. performance ratios, and buy an R6. Yeah, the suspension is great and all, but it's a bit pricey, and maintenance is mandatory every 6K, not optional up to 20K like our Oriental counterparts.

But motorcycles represent part of our emotional psyche, and rarely have a place in reality. We buy and ride the bikes that appeal to us from an asthetic perspective. As you step through the door and into the garage, what kind of sensation does the bike give you? Hell, this is the sole reason behind the success of H-D.

Bottom line: we're not racing, we're riding. Buy what you like, if it's a Shadow or a 996. When you're on two wheels, you're gonna have fun. It's inevitable!

DaJacker
November 16th, 2001, 02:41 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Weave:
[QB]But motorcycles represent part of our emotional psyche, and rarely have a place in reality. We buy and ride the bikes that appeal to us from an asthetic perspective. As you step through the door and into the garage, what kind of sensation does the bike give you? Hell, this is the sole reason behind the success of H-D.

QB]<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Thank you Professor Weave for that analitical insight, and now for our next guest to explain the gyroscopic therory as to why a motorcycle wont fall over in a curve, ALBERT EINSTEIN


http://www.aip.org/history/einstein/images/mainmap.gif

F1
November 16th, 2001, 06:36 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Geek:


And if it's a ZX6 - try and negotiate 50 more horsepower.

bwahaha! :D :D :D<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

No way Hose, I chose the ZX-6R for its mild manners yet smackdown capability. Now that will change in the near future as I crawl up the learning curve, BTW the CBR954RR is said to be laying the smackdown next year, is it true 154 RWHP

Faisal ZX-6R

bvia
November 16th, 2001, 08:59 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Faisal:


No way Hose, I chose the ZX-6R for its mild manners yet smackdown capability. Now that will change in the near future as I crawl up the learning curve, BTW the CBR954RR is said to be laying the smackdown next year, is it true 154 RWHP

Faisal ZX-6R<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

and on that, you'd still be behind me and my lil 'ol 64hp...;)&gt;
There are only 2 things you can never have enough of...talent and experience. Everything else is a wash once the road disappears to the right. Anyone know where I can get either?!?!
bill

[ November 16, 2001: Message edited by: bill via ]

jelliott25
November 16th, 2001, 09:58 PM
And suddenly, I can post!! Thanks admin.

A mighty thank you to all that have responded and to Mike for posting for me in the first place.

You guys have given me a lot to think about but the more I mull it over, the more I'm leaning towards an SVS. I like the look (especially the silver) and the price is certainly right. Is there most loved or most hated dealer here in town? I'm planning to take a tour this weekend and sit on everything I can get my butt on but don't wanna waste my time at any notoriously bad places.

I am curious as to the total lack of love for anything Buell. A guy at work has one and he loves it. Are they unreliable? Slow? Seems like all the reviews of them that I've read have been favorable. I've sat on his and it was fairly comfortable, I thought.

Unfortunately, I found out today that, due to the instructor being called up for military duty, my MSF class this weekend will have to be rescheduled. So it looks like December will be the month. Hopefully I'll luck out and it will be neither freezing cold nor raining that weekend.

I saw one mention of Moto Liberty for helmet shopping. I'm also going to need gloves boots and at least a jacket. Is ML a good place for such things or does it really matter all that much?

It looks like I just missed the monthly meeting by a couple of days but I plan to try and make it to the next one. If nothing else I can at least say hi and drop off a check. smile.gif

As far as buying used. What is considered to average yearly mileage for a motorcycle? What would be high (read, run away from it) mileage?

Is the Honda Hawk regarded well? That's one I would definitely be interested in if I were to shop used.

I'm really not certain if used is someplace I wanna go or not. I can definitely see the logic in it. However,I'm gonna have to finance it anyway if whatever I end up with costs over $2500. Even then, If I spend $2500 cash on something to ride, I'd have to float all of the gear (helmet, boots ets..) on the credit card and I just don't wanna do that if I can help it.

Anything decent on the used market for less that $2K?..........okay, stop laughing.

Thanks again of all of the input, everyone!

[ November 16, 2001: Message edited by: Elliott P. ]

F1
November 16th, 2001, 10:01 PM
No arguement on that one!

Faisa ZX-6R :cool:

Chirpy
November 16th, 2001, 10:48 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR> Anything decent on the used market for less that $2K?..........okay, stop laughing. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

With a little hunting you can probably find an EX500 (baby NInja) in that range. You'll learn corner speed, and a really bad habit of running around with the throttle pinned all the time.

It's a great drop-doggie, when it goes over in the parking lot you'll shrug and laugh. No tears. With great gas mileage and a huge tank, you'll have great cruising range. While it's 50-odd horsepower are mild now, remember that it's more than the first Bonnie's had, or more than a 500 Interceptor.

When you are ready for the next bike, you can sacrifice the EX to the gods, or use it for a track bike. Or ride it into your neighbors pool.

Or sell it for about what you paid for it.

Insurance rates will be, uh, a little less than a Ducati. That's because if you go over the deductible, it's totalled. With all the money you'll save, you can buy first rate gear and go to a track school every other month. Learn to ride, really, really fast.

Then get a faster bike... :D

Just a thought,

Daryl

bvia
November 16th, 2001, 10:54 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Elliott P.:
And suddenly, I can post!! Thanks admin.

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

you're welcome. hope to meet you soon,
bill

dennis w redinger
November 17th, 2001, 08:11 AM
I guess I was just very lucky with my Ducati experience. I had a 900SS for about 6 years and never had a single problem with it. I did my own valve adjustments and cam belt replacements (Randy at Eurosport Cycle showed me how to do those). No clutch problems either. It felt better through the twisties than my ZX-9, just didn't have the *** in the straights. The dealer where I traded in the Duc sold it at auction because they thought the clutch had major problems, "It was rattling and really noisy"! ;) I wish I could have been at the auction to buy it back cheap!

Dave Whitson
November 17th, 2001, 10:57 AM
Ducatis, Ninjas, SVs, GSXR's with turbos :rolleyes: VFRs', etc. There's alot of choices out there. Which one is for you? :confused:

I think everyone of those choices is a bad choice for a first bike. Too much power can be a dangerous thing to an inexperienced rider. Start small and learn how to ride first. There's alot more to it than just twisting the throttle, then when you've got a year or so of experience and confidence under your belt then you can start thinking about trading up to something with a little more power and style.
Motorcycles are dangerous and you don't want to jump right into the deep end of the pool. I wrecked my first bike, which was a 92 FZR600, 2 months after I got it. I was practicing my MSF drills.
I think the Kawi EX 500 is the perfect starter bike for all the reasons Daryl mentioned. That's what it's made for.

Another thing to think about is insurance. You should expect to pay around $1000. a year, or more for a late model 600+ cc sportbike. Insurance rates are ridiculous. But thats because people often get in over there heads when purchasing a sportbike and end wrapping it around a tree, because they don't know how to control all the power at there disposal, and sometimes they even manage to kill themselves in the process. Start Slooooooww smile.gif

Check outSportbikes.net (http://www.sportbikes.net/forums/index.php) Check out the New Rider forum in General Sportbikes. There is a lot of good info in there to absorb. Also, get Keith Codes' Twist of the Wrist II and memorize it.

Good Luck and Happy Hunting smile.gif smile.gif

jelliott25
November 17th, 2001, 02:11 PM
oh my head....... I think I'm just gonna get my ysr running and ride that. :rolleyes:

[ November 17, 2001: Message edited by: Elliott P. ]

DaJacker
November 17th, 2001, 02:17 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Dave W.:
Ducatis, Ninjas, SVs, GSXR's with turbos :rolleyes: VFRs', etc. There's alot of choices out there. Which one is for you? :confused:
smile.gif<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I noticed that you listed the DUCATI FIRST!! as it should be
:D
is your subconscious trying to tell you something? maybe you should consult the magic 8 ball
http://www.futuregroup.com/8ball.gif

F1
November 17th, 2001, 06:34 PM
Dave started with alphabetical order!

Faisal ZX-6R :rolleyes:

[ November 17, 2001: Message edited by: Faisal ]

Dave Whitson
November 17th, 2001, 08:21 PM
Ducati....first on the list....last on the box :D :D

bvia
November 17th, 2001, 08:40 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Dave W.:
Another thing to think about is insurance. You should expect to pay around $1000. a year, or more for a late model 600+ cc sportbike.

Good Luck and Happy Hunting smile.gif smile.gif<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I pay $322.00, full coverage, for the SV-S. Either it isn't a sportbike(tell that to those who are following me) or it's more about the choice you make in the sportbike market.
bill

F1
November 17th, 2001, 09:06 PM
Bill,

You are paying more than its worth!

Faisal ZX-6R :D

bvia
November 17th, 2001, 11:25 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Faisal:
Bill,

You are paying more than its worth!

Faisal ZX-6R :D<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

LOL...it's one of the few things we have in common, Faisal ;)&gt;
bill