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View Full Version : air compressor fs - SOLD!



CarlT
July 27th, 2008, 09:24 PM
Selling the SA chapter's air compressor. I bought a 220v one and need to get this one out of the garage. Proceeds will go towards the chapter's electronic tire balancer (we're getting real close on it too). :thumbsup:

Here's the specs:
Coleman Powermate Black Max model
27 gal. upright tank
5 hp 110v
direct drive compressor (oil-less)
8.2 cfm @ 40 psi
5.6 cfm @ 90 psi
stock regulator knob doesn't work but added an external regulator/water filter/tool oiler
no hoses
works great

$75 and it's yours.

Already sold.

CarlT
July 27th, 2008, 09:38 PM
Pending sale. Dibbs already placed.

Man, that didn't take long. Maybe I should of asked mo' $ :D

CarlT
July 28th, 2008, 09:14 PM
Sold to the young man in the pink thong with cf stiletto heels. :cool:

ZedX
July 29th, 2008, 08:59 AM
added an external regulator/water filter/tool oiler

Got an example? Or can you recognmend the one you used? I recently joined the ranks of the air assisted bolt breakers and strippers. Wanna keep my investment working properly and don't know jack 'bout no new-matics. :D

CarlT
July 29th, 2008, 09:44 AM
Ahh, so you want to break them off pronto huh? :D

The one I used was in this price range http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/Displayitem.taf?itemnumber=1118 but looked more like this: http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/product_6970_200311679_200311679

It was about $35 or so.

windsor
July 29th, 2008, 11:14 AM
An inline tool oiler requires you to run two air hoses, one for tools and one for non-tools.

For most garage work, auto-oilers are -way- overkill and can be messy. Just drop a couple of drops of oil in the air feed of the tool every month.

CarlT
July 29th, 2008, 11:18 AM
An inline tool oiler requires you to run two air hoses, one for tools and one for non-tools.

For most garage work, auto-oilers are -way- overkill and can be messy. Just drop a couple of drops of oil in the air feed of the tool every month.

Good point, I actually never used any oil in the tool oiler. I add a drop or two when I get ready to use them as it's often very infrequent.

ZedX
July 29th, 2008, 11:57 AM
An inline tool oiler requires you to run two air hoses, one for tools and one for non-tools.

For most garage work, auto-oilers are -way- overkill and can be messy. Just drop a couple of drops of oil in the air feed of the tool every month.

ahhh... special oil or some 3n1? thnx

And thanks Carl...

:thumbsup:

CarlT
July 29th, 2008, 01:10 PM
Even Lowe's has pneumatic tool oil. The only reason I even bought that rig was I needed the regulator part. A water filter is nice to have though and a small inline one is cheap and effective enough.

ZedX
July 29th, 2008, 01:49 PM
thnx

jdugger
July 29th, 2008, 01:59 PM
What are you using the compressor for?

If water in your lines becomes a big problem, you can get the coil out of a old refrigerator and push the air through that while dunking it in a bucket of ice water... makes a fantastic air dryer for cheap, even if it is a bit of a PIA to use.

If you need to rig that up, I've got all the brazing torches and stuff necessary to rig that one together. Let me know. It's kind of a fun project.

windsor
July 29th, 2008, 02:00 PM
the tool oil has near the same consistency as sewing machine oil.

(don't ask how I know :o )

windsor
July 29th, 2008, 02:01 PM
Most water precipitates out into the tank anyway. :whyme:

The $40 gadget seems like a safe bet, though.

jdugger
July 29th, 2008, 02:03 PM
Most water precipitates out into the tank anyway. :whyme:

Yup. Easiest way to make a compressor last a lot longer? Drain the tank every time.

CarlT
July 29th, 2008, 02:23 PM
I have a campbell hausfeld small inline water filter on the 40 gal horizontal compressor. I noticed a small amount of water in it (1/2" or so) the other day. It has an easy to drain air valve (like a tire) at the bottom.

Check these out:
http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productDetail&productId=221014-1126-KBA10800AV&lpage=none
http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productDetail&productId=221024-1126-KBA10600AV&lpage=none

ZedX
July 29th, 2008, 02:26 PM
Yup. Easiest way to make a compressor last a lot longer? Drain the tank every time.

the water trap is for protecting the tool not the compressor, eh? :cool:

CarlT
July 29th, 2008, 03:03 PM
the water trap is for protecting the tool not the compressor, eh? :cool:

The heat generated from the compressor causes the water in the air which condensates into the tank.

jdugger
July 29th, 2008, 03:07 PM
the water trap is for protecting the tool not the compressor, eh? :cool:

Right.

Think back to your high school science lessons. What happens to a high pressure gas when it's released? It gets cold. Just like that can of duster air when used a lot all at once. This, btw, is the basic technology behind air conditioning.

So, you compress the air, making it very hot. When it comes out of the tank, the decrease in pressure causes the temp to drop a lot quickly, condensing the water vapor in the compressed air.

That water can be VERY, VERY bad, as in the case of a plasma cutter and other sensitive tools.

It can be relatively harmless, too, as in the case of the tank. Unless, it's allowed to sit around for a while. Then, the water acts as a catylist for rust and other corrosion of the tank itself.

Most shops that use a lot of air will have a refridgerator for the air. That's the best way to get the air really dry. You can make a home-made coon-cooler with some copper coils, good soldering skills, and a trashcan full of ice water. This dries the air very effectively by chilling the air until the water vapor in it condenses, then allowing the air to return to room temp before it reaches the tool.

So, when you finish using your compressor, be sure to release the air and then drain the tank... every time.

jdugger
July 29th, 2008, 03:27 PM
http://i189.photobucket.com/albums/z81/Davebert_bucket/ACpipinglayout1.jpg

ZedX
July 29th, 2008, 03:36 PM
Right.

Think back to your high school science lessons. What happens to a high pressure gas when it's released? It gets cold. Just like that can of duster air when used a lot all at once. This, btw, is the basic technology behind air conditioning..

High school? Science? What is this you speak of? If it wasn't taught in 7th grade under the bleachers I ain't got no clue. :D

paaaalease. :rolleyes:

:cool:

jdugger
July 29th, 2008, 03:46 PM
If it wasn't taught in 7th grade under the bleachers I ain't got no clue.

So Joe did have a big unit?

Yea well I'm a tool geek. We used a lot of air tools for joint prep when I took the tig welding training. I was involved in fabricating some of the air and gas distribution lines one day. It was neat work.... At least to me.

ZedX
July 29th, 2008, 03:58 PM
We used a lot of air tools for joint prep

:paranoid: :cool:

windsor
July 29th, 2008, 04:23 PM
So, when you finish using your compressor, be sure to release the air and then drain the tank... every time.

My compressor is at that perfect size to be annoying, in terms of getting to the drain valve.

It's a big "portable" upright ("portable" meaning that it has a pair of wheels). I guess I should just admit that it's not likely to move from the current location and raise it up so that I can get to the drain valve easily.

Buddy Slover
July 29th, 2008, 11:21 PM
Here is a link to a product we use and sell, fantastic stuff and goes up
quick.

http://www.transair.legris.com/sources/compressedair/HTML_EN/Reseau/fresque.htm

We plumbed a paint kitchen this afternoon with the transair product and had a full loop including drops to 11 stations for pumps and proportioners done in about 2.5 hours just two guys. Kitchen is 20x12 and that included going through the fire rated wall


As for that hard to get drain valve, a easy fix is an auto drain, either float style or electronic timer style

If you forgo a refrigerant dryer, you can use a dissicant or membrane type dryer with good results. Just remember do not place it right at the comperssor of you will still get a large temp drop 20' down stream at the tool and still have moisture