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Thread: Guide to Texas tracks!

  1. #1
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    Default Guide to Texas tracks!

    Maybe Sean can sticky and lock this up if anyone's interested... please don't reply to this thread at least until I'm done posting up the tracks.

    The Motor Sports Ranch (the ONLY true "MSR"), one of my personal all-time favorite tracks, and absolutely my personal favorite tracks in Texas!

    Cresson offers just about all of the most challenging aspects of racing and track riding that every good track in the country offers. It is a very, very safe layout, without walls and trees, and track access by crash crews is very easy due to the layout and arrangement of the paddock.

    Currently, the original configuration of the 1.7 mile track (image below),



    is the track that the CMRA currently races in both clockwise and counter-clockwise directions. The 1.7 mile track is full of some really great combinations with fast and technical tight turns. There are elevation changes that make some of the turns "blind", but not like the drop-offs you'll find on the 1.3 mile track.

    On both the 1.7 and the 1.3 mile track, you'll find incredible traction! On the 1.3, your tires will look like you sanded them with 400 grit sand paper, and everything from regular street tires to pro race slicks will get just about the same level of traction! On the 1.7 mile track however, the track is a real challenge when it's wet. When it's cold and wet, the 1.7 mile track is really slick, and takes quite a bit of skill to get around at a good pace.

    A trip around the 3.1 mile track (both the 1.7 and 1.3 connect to make a 3.1 mile layout) is just a great track experience. The 1.3 mile track has some issues from last year that are (and have been) a bit of a safety challenge for a racing pace, hence the reason why the CMRA races the 1.7 only. It's things like run-off and rocks that make it a bit of a safety issue, along with the number of personnel it takes to safely hold a race event. Over the past off-season, the track owner/ management took on the project of the 1.3 and removed the rocks and planted sod/ grass seed to control run off issues, and so far they've taken very well! They also upgraded the PA system and radios for safety, to complete the safety upgrades in fine fashion.

    Below is the map of the 1.3, and the following is the 3.1.





    A trip around the 3.1 in the counter-clockwise direction would be like this:

    As you enter the track from the 1.7 pit entrance, the first turn you encounter would be the right hander to enter the 1.3 portion. It is a bit blind and tough to get a site on the line as it juuuust has a bit of a rise enough to keep you from seeing the track. As you exit that corner, it is a bit off-camber, and keeps a slight "tilt" from right-left as the next corner comes in to view, a bit of a decreasing radius that ends in a left hander that sends you straight down hill!

    For a car, the down hill portion here would be a couple of corrections of left/ right/ left, but on a bike, you can shoot straight down hill, on throttle, ending at the bottom of the hill with a pretty fast (deceptively) left hander that takes you across the bottom of the course with a short straight ending in a tight up hill, decreasing radius left hander. I've always found traction an issue at the apex there for some reason- probably just rider error. The elevation increases and bends to the left a bit to a very blind crest and entrance to a right hander which is basically a hair-pin. Finding a marker at the crest is tough, the best bet is to hold your line a bit to the left of the track and stay on the gas until you crest the hill, then you can roll off and bend it in for the hairpin to the right.

    As you come around that right, you don't have time to rest at all as you ascend again up an incline sweeper to the left, which ends as a decreasing radius left hander which is a bit blind too. Once you get through that corner, it straightens out and takes you over a pretty good bump on to the 1.7 mile track. If you would stay in that corner bending to the left, you would enter what would be the "front straight" of the 1.3 mile track.

    Once you get on to the 1.7 track, you'll continue up hill to another blind crest, after which the track bends off to the left (a very fast bend) and on to another straight that takes you in to "Little Bend", a fast right hander. Coming out of Little Bend, you'll be hard on the gas and then hard on the brakes coming in to the "Buzzard's Neck", which brings you to the right (carrying good speed) in to my favorite combinations of turns.

    As you come in to Buzzard's Neck, it takes you a bit off camber and up hill again. The next series of turns are really 3 turns taken as one big one. Usually, I keep the bike in about 5 gear (depending on the bike) and modulate the throttle as you stay leaned over dragging a knee for what seems like forever with mid-corner corrections. By the time you get out of "Tombstone", you'll be redlining whichever gear you chose (if you're carrying good speed) and on to the front straight heading toward "Big Bend".

    Big Bend looks like a corner that you need to slow down for, but it's incredibly fast! It's kind of like TWS' turns 1/2, you can take it a lot faster than it looks! Big Bend is a wide open throttle left hander, removing most of your left knee puck every time you get through it! Out of Big Bend is the front straight of the 1.7, and takes you straight in to "Rattle Snake", which is a very intimidating looking combination of corners.

    The Rattle Snake corners is a really quick up hill "chicane" of sorts. When you're coming in to this corner, likely, it's at top speed. With most bikes and with seasoned riders, you'll grab a couple or three gears setting up for this up hill right hander. As soon as you get through the right hander, you've gotta get the bike back over to the left quick as you crest the hill, and then flick it to the right going back down hill and that's the entrance to the 1.3 mile track that we started at.

    I'll get Henry to post up some vid of this track, because I know my descriptions won't do it justice. This track is incredible, it's challenging, and best of all, it's fun! The blind corners, off-camber and on-camber turns, and corner combinations, make this track a "must ride" in anyone's list of tracks. Every time I leave Cresson, I can't wait to go back, even after I've tossed the bike down the track....... :keke:

    Hit me up with any questions, if I can't answer them, I'll make sure one of the really fast guys will!
    Last edited by VFRacer-R; December 5th, 2008 at 11:25 AM.

  2. #2
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    Well, here is the highly controversial and oft debated track in Texas history (probably). World Champions have raced and practiced here, and current club champions continue to bring lap times down down down despite the claims of track deteriorations. The most recent track record was reset this year by Ty Howard and is currently a 1:21.5 (on a 750 no less).

    http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&hl=e...+&ie=UTF8&z=12

    Oak Hill is a tight and technical 1.8 mile track (http://www.oakhillraceway.net), and was built primarily for karting use; however, many years ago the (then) CRRC forged a relationship with the track owners to allow their racers to practice and race there, a relationship that continues to this day (CRRC is now CMRA).

    Once in an interview in his rookie season, Nicky Hayden was asked what his favorite track was, now that he had raced all over the globe. His reply was "Oak Hill in this little Texas town of Henderson. If you can go fast at Oak Hill, you can go fast anywhere!". Nicky's cousins continue this racing heritage with the CMRA, and follow in his footsteps (as well as Colin Edwards, Freddie Spencer, Doug Polen, Kevin Schwantz, and many others) racing at this track and with this organization.

    Many, many folks got their first taste of riding on a race track here, and still many more got their first taste of racing here. Personally, in late 1987, I took the "racing school" with Charles Brothers (then CRRC President, along with his late Wife Connie). I had never been on a track before, and was a "street squid" for the two years previous. That day changed my life forever regarding motorcycles.

    Without further ado, Oak Hill Raceway is a grippy little tire shredding track, with awesome traction in cold or even wet weather. The pavement is said to have quartz in it, which is supposed to be the biggest contributor to the traction there. When you look at the track while it's sunny, you can see the glints and sparkles in the pavement from the quartz.

    Here is a aerial photo:




    The paddock is dirt/ grass for the most part, the only paved areas are the road leading to the pit and tech shed area. There is water and electricity, but you have to get there early to snag a spot that has it. Your best bet is to bring a generator and water with you.

    As you enter the track, there is a blend line that you MUST use if there is others on the track. You're entering turn 1, which is very, very fast, and not using the blend line could result in a very brutal accident. As you enter turn 1, you're going slightly down hill until you reach the "apex" and start the ascent up hill. As you crest the hill, the track flattens out a bit before you enter turn 2, which is a tight decreasing radius left hander. Exiting turn 2 finds a sweeping bend to the right, that begins taking you down hill in to infamous turn 3.

    Turn 3 always looks like it's dirty. The supposed reason for that is another characteristic of Oak Hill's pavement and surrounding soil, which is rich in iron. The "dirty" look is actually a bit of rust they say, from all the iron (and also gives the dirt it's red color). Turn 3 is a great little grippy (on the right line) left hand hair pin turn that begins at the bottom of the down hill trip you began after turn 2, and ends taking you up hill again and off-camber a bit through the turn. As you ascend up hill again, the track bends off to the right, and takes you in to turn 4, which is a deceptively fast right hander that is a small sweeper and decreases slightly as it takes back down hill in to turn 5. Turn 5 is always (for me) much faster than it looks, and much faster than I take it. I always get on the brakes too much there, and don't know why. I think it's because the down hill from turn 4 and the speed of turn 4 makes it seem like I'm going in too fast or something.

    Out of turn 5 leads you to a short straight that has no elevation in to slightly off camber turn 6. Turn 6 can be "traction challenged" if you take a bad line through it. The problem is that turn 6 never really seems to end.... you bend it in to the left entering the turn, and follow it around (blindly) increasing your speed continuing the lean left and then slightly up hill again, until the track opens up to decreasing radius turn 7. Turn 7 gets tight and opens up to a small bit of straight before entering the tight, decreasing radius again, turn 8 hair pin. Turn 8 can be a first gear turn for some, and as you exit, you're hard on the gas as you complete the course down the "front straight" which is actually a long sweeper that descends again gradually and in to turn 1.

    Oak Hill is a very technical and challenging course, that is definitely not for the faint of heart to go fast at. There's no good reason why new track day riders or racers can't ride there, because when you leave for the day, you'll be a much better rider! When you attend another track day at other tracks that have no elevations or blind corners, you'll see how un-interesting those tracks actually are, and you'll find yourself longing to get back to the East Texas Hills near Henderson Texas!

    People always say, "you'll either love OHR or hate it", but the funny thing is, even the people that "hate" is continue to go there and very likely have a secret "love" for the place anyway.
    Last edited by VFRacer-R; December 5th, 2008 at 11:48 AM.

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    Wow, what a first day we had there! After two rain outs and giving credits to folks for them, we finally got to ride this fun track! I spent the majority of my day on my GSXR 600 so I could either prove or dis-spell some of the information that was out there to myself.

    Well, some of the information was true, some was not. The true parts were that it is indeed "tight" and indeed technical. Neither of those points is a negative to me, I love those types of tracks, and for me, it is the main way to test yourself as a rider since top speed never really comes in to play at all. The rumors that I disagree with is that you "can't ride a big bike there". I think that it is holey untrue. I rode my 600 there all day, as well as watching some folks ride liter bike there (like Chris Romeo). After about 8 laps, I was pretty whooped, especially in the afternoon after riding almost every session in the am. The track will give you a great workout!

    Now for the track:

    http://grandsportspeedway.com/



    As you enter the track, you encounter a bend to the right that brings you in to a decreasing radius left hander. The first thing you'll notice is that even though you can see seams from the pavement being laid, you don't feel them at all. The track is so smooth and nice, it's like riding on glass.

    The first turn decreases left and then immediately cuts to the right, and then left again in an open short sweeper. As you pick up speed, the track bends to the right again and you "shoot" straight through full on throttle to the "back straight". I put back straight in quotation marks because you never really get a rest or "straight" part of the track as the track really has no "straight" parts to it. I grab 4th gear here, and by the time I wind it out and can maybe switch to 5th, it's time to set up for a really deceptive left hander that is incredibly tight at the end. As you enter this turn, it looks like you have to be hard on the brakes, but you really don't. It bends off to the left, but you just continue straight to the outside curbing and then begin your turn, so that you can have a straighter shot through the decreasing radius corner there.

    As you get through there, it's on the gas again bending the bike to the right around a curve that finishes on a tight right. You take this corner by clipping the apex and widening out your line. The problem is getting the bike back over to the left bend that finishes in a tight little hair pin left. As you exit that hairpin left, you're back on the gas bending off to the right which is the "front straight". As you come down this "front straight", you'll come up on the kink to the right which is also a lot faster than it looks. I'll usually grab 4th gear on the way up on the "front straight" and then grab 3rd as I go through that kink, and then finally blip and downshift to 2nd to continue on the track to the left.

    So as best as I can remember, it's 4th gear on the front straight, blip and downshift to 3rd and carry speed through the kink, blip and carry speed in 2nd for the tight left, quick right, bend left, upshift to 3rd, carry speed right and upshift to 4th, wind out 4th and grab 3rd to set up for the tight left, hard on gas for the right bend and roll off for the tight right, hard on the gas and then roll off blip for 2nd and carry speed through the hair pin left, hard on the gas bending right and grab two gears as I accelerate down the front straight.

    Whew! Just recalling that makes me tired!

    The motarded guys loved the track. Those fuggers could stick the bike in at any point in the corner, at any speed, and do whatever they wanted to get in and out of the turns. It was nauseating! I was pizzed because I felt like I had to hold certain lines and speeds to get through them right, and those guys were just banging through wherever and when ever they wanted!

    Memo got me at a fastest lap of 1:12.XX. I'm not sure if that is a good time or not, but felt pretty good. I know a lot of other folks were going faster around that track, so time will tell what "fast is".

    Here's some laps following Macman around while he was riding "control" for the "c" group on 5-26. If you see a "cut through" at some point, just disregard it... clearly it was a figment of your imagination!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1w2gGf9ByTo

    Thanks to Jeff Kimball for hookin' it up for us with some great video!
    Last edited by VFRacer-R; December 5th, 2008 at 11:32 AM.

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    Texas World Speedway (TWS). Likely the most popular track day event location in Texas, and the track most favored by many racers in the CMRA- possibly even before the recent improvements (more on that later); it was built in 1969.
    TWS is usually run the in 2.9 mile configuration (shown below), but the CMRA will run mini GP events on the 1.8 mile configuration too.


    TWS is big, very fast, wide, and has a little elevation to keep things interesting. Most of the "fast" racers will circulate the 2.9 in the mid 1:40's, and Ty Howard holds this lap record as well at 1:43.0.
    As you exit "pit out" and on to hot pit road, you run parallel to the banked front straight and enter the track in turn 1. Staying inside the blend line is really important here as well if there are people on the track already (their closing speeds will be north of 100mph). With warm tires, you can enter turn one from hot pit at almost top speed (some of the fast guys with big bawls will). As you continue to roll on the throttle, you're almost at full lean scrubbing speed as you corner. Turns 1 & 2 are really one big turn and really is just a big double apex at near top speed. Continuing on through turn 1, the blend line will end and you'll see the apex for turn 2, as you clip that, it's hard on the gas widening out and accelerating to the entrance of turn 3, a fast right 90* right hander.
    This was taken as I was coming out of turn 2, picked up my knee as I got back on the throttle (turn 2 will eat a lot of knee pucks):


    The angle of the turns here really doesn't matter too much as the track is so wide, a 90* turn can be taken as a 30* turn, so hopefully that is a little perspective. Some riders will grab 1 or 3 downshifts in to this corner, depending on their speed and bike. As you smoothly open the throttle through turn 3, you straighten the bike up with full throttle and and upshift (or two). Once you do that, you'll be crossing "wheelie hill", a rise in the pavement that occurs as you cross over the NASCAR track and outside the oval. Lots of folks try for photo ops here.
    This is coming in to turn 3, and then the next one is exiting turn 3:



    As you cross wheelie hill, turn 4 will open up for you. Most people make the mistake of braking here (a mistake if you're trying to go fast), and most racers will take advantage of that and make a lot of passes here. It's one of my favorite spots to overtake. Turn 4 is another fast right hander that as you accelerate through the corner, take it a bit wide, and open up for turn 5 & 6. Turns 5 & 6 are a lot like turns 1 & 2 in that it is a wide, fast, pretty much double apex left hander. The trick here is to come in wide from the outside of 5, apex somewhere low near the bottom of the track (about 5-8 feet off the curbing), and take your line really wide to the outside edge before entering 6 and clipping the apex there, smoothly opening the throttle to wide open when you exit. This will bring you on to the back straight.
    The back straight has enough room for most bikes to wind out 6th gear before rolling off or grabbing a downshift for turn 7, a very fast, slightly uphill left hander that is also called the "gravity cavity". If you take this corner at a good speed, you'll feel your suspension completely compress and pull your chest and head on to the top of your tank. It's a cool feeling. I attribute this to the speed (I personally don't brake for this corner and only roll off depending on my speed, then get back on the gas hard up the hill), and also to the change to a positive camber turn that takes you up hill. The pavement sealer here is also very grippy. There is one "hazard" in this corner though, but if you're taking the corner the right way and looking waaaay up the hill, you shouldn't have a problem. It's the curbing. The track put in "tiger's teeth" curbing here, and the first lap I did when I first saw it kinda freaked me out a bit. I've had knee pucks ripped off there since then, and it hurt a bit too (I know, waaaa waaaa waaaa). Before this new curbing, it wasn't unusual to skim your knee on the curbing or even the grass- not now boy-o's! Here is a pic of me coming through turn 7, it was taken right as I got through the apex of the turn, past the curbing and was accelerating up the hill. You can see the pavement sealer pretty well in this pic:


    As you come up the hill out of turn 7, you come upon the only blind set of turns at this track. Your instincts will tell you to go slowly through here, but it's really a lot faster than you think it is, and you have more time than you think you do to get on the brakes and turn (if you need to brake). Looking waaaaaay ahead in these turns is pretty much mandatory. Looking off of the track will take you straight there.
    As you come up to the crest of the hill out of 7, you'll see the track open up to the left in to the turn 8/ 8a turns. Turn 8 is a kink to the left with a few bumps, and turn 8a is a right hander that takes you back down hill. Turn 8a is the famous turn here, and for decades was a hot topic of debate on track safety. There used to be a tire and concrete wall there, and more than one person was seriously injured (requiring many surgeries and long hospitalizations), as well as a young man who lost his life there during a practice session. There have been others too, and when the wall was removed, it was a small victory for people who wanted to race there. I personally would like to thank all those involved, many who were responsible are near and dear to me. It won't get those lives back, but it will help to ensure that nobody else is claimed by it.
    Anyway, back to 8a, it bends off to the right and takes you back down hill. The pavement at the apex of 8a is pretty deteriorated, but for some reason, I always come right through it :dontknow: . As you come back down the hill out of 8a, you'll cross back over the NASCAR straight and come into the "horseshoe", the only hair pin at this track. Like many of the other corners here, there are LOTS of ways to get through the horseshoe.

    The horseshoe is a (still pretty fast) right hander that has you dragging a knee all the way through. It opens up to another great overtaking spot, turn 10, which is a quick left hand kink that begins as soon as you get around the horseshoe. It's fast, and if you're watching the guy's line in front of you, you can overtake him by squaring off the corner or taking them inside- outside and hard on the gas. Here is another sets of pics, the first two in the horseshoe and the next is in turn 10:




    Now, the most common thing I see folks do when they come out of turn 10 is when they get on the gas, they immediately roll off or brake for the left hand kink they come up on quickly. This little kink is so wide, and so fast, you can really do a lot of passing here, especially if the person your passing is not familiar with the track. As you come up to the kink, it looks tighter than it is because the pavement falls off camber a bit, and it doesn't look like you have as much room as you actually do.
    As you get through here, the track opens up to reveal the again wide turn 11, which is the fast left hander that is the precursor to the chicane of TWS. Turn 11 is another deceptively fast left hander, that is wide. The right line through here takes you in to the chicane, which is a quick right then left, and opens up to the ultra-wide exit and entrance on to the infamous banked front straight. Getting through the chicane is the only real technical part of TWS, and again, NOT looking through your lines will screw up your entry and exit here.
    As you get out of the chicane and on to the front straight, you'll see people take all kinds of lines. Some go straight up to the wall at the top of the track, some stay really low, some in the middle, etc. For most folks who are new to TWS, I usually recommend taking the middle, and if their bike is down on power (like a stock SV), I usually advise them to stay low. Let the fast guys have the high line, and if they want a middle or low line, they'll get around you. Most of the slower or lower hp bikes waste too much energy going to the top IMHO.
    This brings us to the front straight and the entrance to turn 1 & 2. This is the most oft debated area of this track, and the most mentioned area I can recall. Again, there are so many lines through here, it's ridiculous. The people the really entertain me at TWS are the ones that preach a "right" line here. I've seen really fast guys take a high line and dive in to turn 1, and I've seen really fast guys that take a low line and carry their speed around turn 1. The thing is though, not many fast guys take a middle entry to turn 1, it can be suspension un-settlingly bumpy as Hell.

    Sorry for the model in the pics, he's the only one I had.

  5. #5
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    URRacingpix.com followed our main man Macman around during a "B" group session as he evaluated some of the riders taking the CMRA licensing school.

    This vid takes several laps around the 2.9 mile track, and illustrates the different lines that can be taken pretty well. Try to apply some of the stuff I outlined in my "TWS Guide" post above to the video to provide some moving imagery.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g_SY6z2D4vg
    Last edited by VFRacer-R; December 5th, 2008 at 11:34 AM.

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    Well, I've been anxious to ride this track, and it didn't disappoint. I was very pleased with the track surface, and they appear to have done a good job of fixing the issues with the pavement. Kudos to them for getting things done before the CMRA came to town!

    Eagle's Canyon in Decatur Texas is 2.5 miles of undulating pavement through NE Texas hillside!

    Eagle's Canyon is currently a member's facility that rents out for racing and track days. It's way out in the geographic center of "nowhere", and there is no really good way to get there from Houston. You just have to suck it up and make the drive, 'cause it's worth it. As far as tracks in Texas go, it's a close second or third when compared relative to technicality and "fun" factors in my book. I still haven't ridden a track that is as safe, fun, and technical as MSR (Cresson you knuckleheads), Eagle's Canyon is almost as fun, and just as technical as MSR, but not as technical as GSS or Oak Hill. The Mercedes Benz course in Angleton would be a distant 4th or 5th when compared to the above tracks in those regards for comparison's sake.

    On to the track; as you come out on to hot pit, the pit road takes you out to turn 2 and up hill. When you're on pace, this hill makes turn 3 blind, and on pace, you had better be off the gas and on the brakes when you crest the hill too! As soon as you crest the hill, the track breaks off left in to a double apex hair pin turn. It finishes off taking you back down hill and breaks off to the right in a bend as you go down hill they call turn 4 (but is really just a bend down the hill, not really a "turn" per se). As soon as you descend the hill, you start going back up hill to turn 5. I found that as the day went on, I was taking turn 5 up hill and to the right tighter and tighter to the curbing. It didn't start the day out that way, but did later on as I rode more with the expert racers.

    Turn 5 finishes pretty well with a gradual rise that starts gradually back down hill (not a big drop in elevation, just a slight decrease). This brings you to turn 6 (a left hand hair pin). The entrance to turn 6 is deceptive! As you're coming down in to it, the appearance is that you need to start braking. The braking markers (500, 400, 300, etc) are way off in relation to the other markers at this track. It encourages you to brake early here and I found myself braking too much and too early in to this entrance. The faster guys were blowing my doors off coming to to this turn almost every time. As you finish turn 6, you start another gradual ascent to the "back straight" (another .0001 second "rest" period). I could actually hit 5th gear on that "straight", only to bang down to 3rd for the tight left hand turn 7 that crests the hill and starts back down to the right hand turn 8. Between 6&7, the pavement has some wavy bumps. It's not dangerous or scary, but your bike does move quite a bit. Now turn 7 is another story. I never could find a good way through there without bumps. It didn't upset the bike too much, but it made the bike feel like it was chattering because of it.

    The cool thing about turn 7 is that it's actually at the highest point of the track, and you can literally feel it as you crest the hill and start back down the other side. Turn 8 comes up quick, and it's a lot faster than it looks as you're going down. Turn 8 finishes and continues down hill to turn 9 which is way faster than it looks breaking left in a double apex and continuing even more down hill. A short distance of about 40' feet maybe and you're turning right for turn 10 which is taking you back up hill in a long right hander. Your knee plants firmly on the pavement here on the way up, and if you carry your speed and accelerate up the hill, your toe will soon be dragging too (my toe slider on the right is just about gone!). If you're not accelerating, you'll lose lots of time here.

    Turn 10 finishes back on the same elevation as the pit out and brings you to the final hair pin, and probably the slowest turn on the track. Turn 11 is a tough nut to crack. It's a tight hair pin left, and I could not find a really good way to get through it. I tried early apex holding a tight line for the second apex; I tried a tight apex and carried it wide and back in tight for the second apex; I tried staying wide around the whole thing, I just never found a way I like around it. I'm going to work on that corner next time we go.

    After you get out of 11, you get to the only real straight at the track. You grab 2 upshifts (depending on the bike and rider, some grab 3, some grab only 1) and cross the start/ finish line. I use that as a marker for my first down shift and grabbed another before I began turn in to turn 1. Turn 1 breaks to the right and is a lot faster than it looks too! As soon as you get through turn 1, you set up immediately for turn 2 and head back up the hill. Accelerate hard up the hill, but remember, you need to be off the gas and on the brake as you crest the hill to set your corner speed for turn 3! It'll be right there when you get to the top!

    All in all, the track wasn't as "blind" as I had heard in regards to turns. I really only found one turn that was truly blind- the rest you could scan ahead and plan your lines well with good vision once you find your way around the place.

    It was a fun track, there are some other issues with it that I wish were different, but all in all, a fun track.

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